Temporal predictability enhances judgements of causality in elemental causal induction from both observation and intervention

William Greville, Marc Buehner

Allbwn ymchwil: Cyfraniad at gyfnodolynErthygladolygiad gan gymheiriaid

9 Dyfyniadau (Scopus)
229 Wedi eu Llwytho i Lawr (Pure)

Crynodeb

When the temporal interval or delay separating cause and effect is consistent over repeated instances, it becomes possible to predict when the effect will follow from the cause, hence temporal predictability serves as an appropriate term for describing consistent cause-effect delays. It has been demonstrated that in instrumental action-outcome learning tasks, enhancing temporal predictability by holding the cause-effect interval constant elicits higher judgements of causality compared to conditions involving variable temporal intervals. Here, we examine whether temporal predictability exerts a similar influence when causal learning takes place through observation rather than intervention through instrumental action. Four experiments demonstrated that judgements of causality were higher when the temporal interval was constant than when it was variable, and that judgements declined with increasing variability. We further found that this beneficial effect of predictability was stronger in situations where the effect base-rate was zero (Experiments 1 and 3). The results therefore clearly indicate that temporal predictability enhances impressions of causality, and that this effect is robust and general. Factors that could mediate this effect are discussed.
Iaith wreiddiolSaesneg
Tudalennau (o-i)678-97
Nifer y tudalennau20
CyfnodolynThe Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Cyfrol69
Rhif cyhoeddi4
Dynodwyr Gwrthrych Digidol (DOIs)
StatwsCyhoeddwyd - 21 Mai 2015

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