A 15-week vitamin D supplementation and indoor cycling intervention reduces exercising heart rate, with no effect on glycaemic control in healthy adults: A pilot investigation

Ffion Curtis, Rhys Thatcher, Sam Rice, Glen Davison

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Abstract

Significant positive correlations are often observed between vitamin D concentrations and physical activity levels. Whilst this may be due to individuals who are physically active spending time outdoors (i.e. increased opportunity for vitamin D synthesis), there is growing evidence to suggest a more complex relationship between vitamin D status, physical fitness and health outcomes. To explore this further thirty-nine healthy adults were randomly allocated to 15 weeks of exercise training (Ex), no training (NoEx), 2000 IU/day vitamin D (VitD) and/or placebo (Pla) supplementation (giving four possible allocations: NoEx+VitD; NoEx+Pla; Ex+VitD; Ex+Pla). Vitamin D status, glycaemic control and exercise responses were measured pre- and post-intervention. A series of 2 x 2 ANOVAs failed to find any effect of supplementation or exercise on any of the measures except heart rate during low intensity exercise, and vitamin D status. Heart rate was significantly reduced (6%, p < 0.05) in the Ex+VitD group. Vitamin D status was significantly raised (28%, p < 0,05) in the supplementation groups (NoEx+VitD and Ex+VitD) at a time of year (August-November) when a seasonal decline was observed in the placebo groups (33%, p < 0.05). These findings indicate that vitamin D supplementation (2000 IU/day) may have an enhancing role alongside exercise in inducing cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise training. Further investigations are required to confirm these findings and identify the mechanisms involved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-283
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Exercise Science
Volume10
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 01 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • cholecalciferol
  • heart rate
  • glycaemic control

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