A dynamic, modifiable model for estimating cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in pregnancy: Application to an RCT of self-help delivered by text message

Matthew Jones*, Murray Smith, Sarah Lewis, Steve Parrott, Tim Coleman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (SciVal)
35 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background and Aims: Previous evaluations of smoking cessation interventions in pregnancy have several limitations. Our solution to these limitations is the Economics of Smoking in Pregnancy (ESIP) model, which estimates the life-time cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in pregnancy from a National Health Service (NHS) and personal social services perspective. We aim to (1) describe how ESIP has been constructed and (2) illustrate its use with trial data. Methods: ESIP links mothers’ and offspring pregnancy outcomes to estimate the burdens of smoking-related disease they experience with different rates of smoking in pregnancy, both in pregnancy and throughout their life-times. Smoking rates are inputted by model users. ESIP then estimates the costs of treating disease burdens and also mothers’ and offspring life-years and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). By comparing costs incurred and healthy life following different smoking rates, ESIP estimates incremental cost-effectiveness and benefit–cost ratios for mothers or offspring or both combined. We illustrate ESIP use using data from a pragmatic randomized controlled trial that tested a smoking cessation intervention in pregnancy. Results: Throughout women's and offspring life-times, the intervention proved cheaper than usual care, having a negative incremental cost of £38.37 (interquartile range = £21.46–56.96) and it improved health, demonstrating a 0.04 increase in incremental QALYs for mothers and offspring, implying that it is ‘dominant’ over usual care. Benefit–cost ratios suggested that every £1 spent would generate a median of £14 (interquartile range = £8–20) in health-care savings. Conclusions: Economics of Smoking in Pregnancy is the first economic model to link mothers’ and infants’ costs and benefits while reporting cost-effectiveness in readily-comparable units. Using ESIP with data from a trial which reported only short-term economic analysis showed that the intervention was very likely to be cost-effective in the longer term and to generate health-care savings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-365
Number of pages13
JournalAddiction
Volume114
Issue number2
Early online date05 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cost-effective
  • economic evaluation
  • pregnancy
  • smoking
  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco
  • Quality-Adjusted Life Years
  • Self Care/economics
  • Smoking Cessation/economics
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Prenatal Care/economics
  • Text Messaging/economics
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Complications/economics
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Female
  • Tobacco Smoking/economics

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