A narrative review investigating the potential effect of lubrication as a mitigation strategy for whey protein-associated mouthdrying

Holly Giles, Stephanie P. Bull, Stella Lignou, Joe Gallagher, Marianthi Faka, Lisa Methven*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

Whey is consumed by active adults to aid muscle recovery and growth, the general population as a nutritious convenient food, and by older adults to prevent sarcopenia due to its high leucine content. However, whey protein has poor consumer acceptance in this latter demographic, partially due to mouthdrying. This is thought to result from electrostatic interactions between whey and salivary proteins, mucoadhesion to the oral mucosa, and the inherent astringency of acidity. Previous unsuccessful mitigation strategies include viscosity, sweetness and fat manipulation. This literature review reveals support for increasing lubrication to reduce mouthdrying. However, of the 50 papers reviewed, none have proposed a method by which whey protein could be modified as an ingredient to reduce mouthdrying in whey-fortified products. This review recommends the use of modern technologies to increase lubrication as a novel mitigation strategy to reduce mouthdrying, with the potential to increase consumer acceptance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number137603
Number of pages11
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume436
Early online date11 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2024

Keywords

  • Fortification
  • Lubrication
  • Mouthdrying
  • Mouthfeel
  • Supplementation
  • Whey
  • Humans
  • Aged
  • Whey Proteins
  • Dietary Supplements

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