A Neurologic Perspective of Equine Stereotypy

Sebastian McBride*, Andrew Hemmings

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

58 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Discussion on the cause of equine stereotypy dates back nearly 400 years and has remained as speculation until recently. Research now provides empirical support to many previously untested hypotheses identifying restricted feeding, reduced social contact, and diminished locomotor activity as being critical to increased risk of stereotypy development. This review critically assesses this and other current research into equine and none quine stereotypy and concludes with a neurologic model of equine stereotypy development that highlights genetype dependent upregulation of transmission in midbrain dopaminergic pathways as being extremely important to the underlying causes. Dismantling this model may provide additional strategies of stereotypy impediment and reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Equine Veterinary Science
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Equine
  • Stereotypy
  • Review
  • Striatum
  • Dopamine
  • NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS DOPAMINE
  • DRUG-ADDICTION
  • FOOD-INTAKE
  • PHARMACOLOGICAL MANIPULATION
  • SURGICAL-TREATMENT
  • FRONTAL-CORTEX
  • STABLED HORSES
  • YOUNG HORSES
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • BEHAVIOR

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