A review of the use of radio-echo sounding in glaciology

Louise A. Plewes, Bryn Hubbard

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

118 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Radio-echo sounding (RES), or radar, is an established geophysical technique that has been, and continues to be, applied to investigate a variety of ice-mass properties. This review presents the physical theory and principles of radio-glaciology, and describes the various types of radar equipment commonly used, including modern, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) systems. The range of glaciological applications these systems have been used to investigate is summarized, along with promising avenues of current and future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-236
Number of pages34
JournalProgress in Physical Geography
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2001

Keywords

  • glacier
  • ice sheet
  • IRH
  • radar
  • radio-echo sounding
  • GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR
  • ANTARCTIC ICE-SHEET
  • CENTRAL EAST ANTARCTICA
  • DATA-ACQUISITION-SYSTEM
  • SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK
  • HAUT GLACIER DAROLLA
  • SHORT-PULSE RADAR
  • POLAR ICE
  • HIGH-RESOLUTION
  • WEST ANTARCTICA

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A review of the use of radio-echo sounding in glaciology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this