A sticky situation: Solifugids (Arachnida, Solifugae) use adhesive organs on their pedipalps for prey capture

Rodrigo H. Willemart, Roger Douglas Santer, Andrew J. Spence, Eileen A. Hebets

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Solifugids (Arachnida, Solifugae) have unique evertable adhesive organs on the tips of their pedipalps, named ‘suctorial’ or ‘palpal’ organs. Previous studies have shown that these organs enable solifugids to climb smooth glass-like surfaces and have hypothesized that these structures facilitate prey capture. Here, we use high-speed videography to demonstrate that the suctorial organs of Eremochelis bilobatus are its primary means of capturing insect prey. We also present calculations of the adhesive pressure exerted by these suctorial organs during real prey capture events.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-180
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Ethology
Volume29
Issue number1
Early online date12 Jun 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Solifuge
  • Adhesion
  • Foraging
  • Suctorial organ
  • Palpal organ

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