Borehole drainage and its implications for the investigation of glacier hydrology: experiences from Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland

Shulamit Gordon, Martin Sharp, Bryn Hubbard, Ian Willis, Chris Smart, Luke Copland, Jon Harbor, Bradley Ketterling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Studies of glacier hydrology rely increasingly on measurements made in boreholes as a basis for reconstructing the character and behaviour of subglacial drainage systems. In temperate glaciers, in which boreholes remain open to the atmosphere following drilling, the interpretation of such data map be complicated by supraglacial or englacial water flows to and from boreholes.

We report on a suite of techniques used to identify borehole water sources and to reconstruct patterns of water circulation within boreholes at Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. Results are used to define a number of borehole 'drainage' types. Examples of each drainage type are presented, along with the manner in which they influence interpretations of borehole water-levels, borehole water-quality data, and borehole dye Lr aces. The analysis indicates that a full understanding of possible borehole drainage modes is required for the correct interpretation of many borehole observations, and that those observations provide an accurate indication of subglacial conditions only under relatively restricted circumstances. Copyright (C) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)797-813
Number of pages17
JournalHydrological Processes
Volume15
Issue number5
Early online date26 Mar 2001
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2001

Keywords

  • subglacial hydrology
  • borehole drainage
  • temperate glaciers
  • SOUTH CASCADE GLACIER
  • SUBGLACIAL HYDRAULIC-PROPERTIES
  • WATER-LEVEL VARIATIONS
  • TEMPERATE GLACIERS
  • VARIEGATED GLACIER
  • WASHINGTON-STATE
  • SURGE MECHANISM
  • PRESSURE
  • SYSTEM
  • FLOW

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