‘British Security Liaison in the Middle East: the Introduction of Police/Security Advisers and the Lebanon-Iraq-Jordan ‘Anti-Communist Triangle’ from 1949 to 1958’

Chikara Hashimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Using newly released and previously unexploited records, this article explores the existence of Anglo-Arab secret liaison and cooperation in instituting anti-communist measures in the early Cold War. It shows that owing to their concern about a war against the Soviet Union, the placing of a British security/police adviser in specific countries was the preferred method by Britain for checking and combatting communism in the Middle East. It argues that the development of the ‘anti-communist triangle’ (the security liaison between Lebanon, Iraq and Jordan) was largely influenced by British concern about the expansion of communist influence. Moreover, the expansion of British influence in the region also converged with the demands from Middle Eastern countries for a British expert in anti-communist measures. The article implies the importance of the role of secret liaison in historical enquiries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)848-874
Number of pages28
JournalIntelligence and National Security
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Oct 2012

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