Compensatory growth and food consumption in gibel carp, Carassius auratus givelio, and Chinese longsnout catfish, Leiocassis longirostris, experiencing cycles of feed deprivation and re-feeding

Xiaoming Zhu, Shouqi Xie, Zhongju Zou, Wu Lei, Yibo Cui, Yunxia Yang, Robert John Wootton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The compensatory responses of juvenile gibel carp and Chinese longsnout catfish to four cycles of 1 week of feed deprivation and 2 weeks of satiation feeding were quantified as part of a study designed to determine feeding regimes that would maximise growth rates. Both species showed compensatory growth in the re-feeding periods. The compensation was not sufficient for the deprived fish to match the growth trajectories of controls fed to satiation daily. The compensatory growth response was more clearly defined in the later cycles. The deprived fish showed hyperphagia during the 2-week periods of re-feeding and the hyperphagic response was clearer in the later cycles. The hyperphagia tended to persist for both weeks of the re-feeding period. The gibel carp showed no difference in gross growth efficiency between deprived and control fish. In the catfish, the gross growth efficiency of the deprived fish was marginally higher than that of control fish, but the efficiency varied erratically from week to week. Over the experiment, the deprived fish achieved growth rates 75–80% of those shown by control fish, although fed at a frequency of 66%. There was no evidence of growth over-compensation with the deprivation–re-feeding protocol used in this study.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-247
Number of pages13
JournalAquaculture
Volume241
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sept 2004

Keywords

  • Gibel carp
  • Chinese long snout catfish
  • Compensatory growth
  • Hyperphagia
  • Growth efficiency

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