Defining key metabolic roles in osmotic adjustment and ROS homeostasis in the recretohalophyte Karelinia caspia under salt stress

Qiang Guo, Jiwan Han, Cui Li, Xincun Hou, Chunqiao Zhao, Qinghai Wang, Juying Wu, Luis Mur

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Abstract

The recretohalophyte Karelinia caspia is of forage and medical value and can remediate saline soils. We here assess the contribution of primary/secondary metabolism to osmotic adjustment and ROS homeostasis in Karelinia caspia under salt stress using multi-omic approaches. Computerized phenomic assessments, tests for cellular osmotic changes and lipid peroxidation indicated that salt treatment had no detectable physical effect on K. caspia. Metabolomic analysis indicated that amino acids, saccharides, organic acids, polyamine, phenolic acids, and vitamins accumulated significantly with salt treatment. Transcriptomic assessment identified differentially expressed genes closely linked to the changes in above primary/secondary metabolites under salt stress. In particular, shifts in carbohydrate metabolism (TCA cycle, starch and sucrose metabolism, glycolysis) as well as arginine and proline metabolism were observed to maintain a low osmotic potential. Chlorogenic acid/vitamin E biosynthesis was also enhanced, which would aid in ROS scavenging in the response of K. caspia to salt. Overall, our findings define key changes in primary/secondary metabolism that are coordinated to modulate the osmotic balance and ROS homeostasis to contribute to the salt tolerance of K. caspia.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13663
Number of pages16
JournalPhysiologia Plantarum
Volume174
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Ecophysiology, stress and adaptation
  • ORIGINAL ARTICLE
  • ORIGINAL ARTICLES

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