Evidence for morphology induced sediment settlement prevention on the tubular sponge Haliclona urceolus

James John Bell

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27 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Several mechanisms are known to assist the survival of sponges in highly sedimented environments. This study considers the potential of sponge morphology and the positioning of exhalant water jets (through the osculum) in the adaptation of Haliclona urceolus to highly sedimented habitats. This sponge is cylindrical with an apical osculum, which is common in sedimented subtidal habitats at Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve, Cork, Ireland. Fifteen sponges were collected, preserved (killed with the structure and morphology maintained) and then replaced in a high sediment environment next to a living specimen (at 24 m). After 5 days, the sediment settled on both living and preserved sponges was collected and dried. No sediment was collected from living sponges, while preserved specimens had considerable amounts of settled sediment on their surfaces. The amount of sediment collected on these preserved specimens was significantly linearly correlated with sponge dry weight, maximum diameter and oscula width (R2>0.70, P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-38
Number of pages10
JournalMarine Biology
Volume146
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jul 2004

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