Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Probabilistic Database for Identification of Bacterial Isolates from Urinary Tract Infections

Yankuba Kassama, Paul J. Rooney, Royston Goodacre

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16 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The ability of the fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) technique to identify bacterial isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) was investigated. FAFLP was carried out using the single primer combination MseI plus CT and EcoRI plus 0, and information-rich FAFLP profiles were generated from all 69 UTI isolates studied, which comprised both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria encompassing eight genera. The genetic relatedness of these 69 bacteria was determined by cluster analysis, and this revealed eight main groups corresponding to the eight bacterial genera. Finer discrimination on the same dendrogram showed species and subspecies differentiations, thus demonstrating the potential of FAFLP for describing a wide diversity range within microbial populations. The interpretation of FAFLP profiles is often complicated because it relies upon the investigator interpreting dendrograms; this process may be subjective if the tree is complicated, particularly if it includes polytomies (unresolved nodes). Therefore, we have developed a method based on Bayes' theorem for the identification of bacteria against an FAFLP probabilistic identification matrix. Thus, FAFLP is suitable for the objective identification of causal agents of UTI, and the procedure offers great potential in the clinical laboratory.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2795-2800
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2002

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