How dawn turned into dusk: Scoping and closing possible nuclear futures after the Cold War

Benoît Pelopidas*, Hebatalla Taha, Tom Vaughan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

How was the scope of nuclear weapons policy change immediately after the Cold War determined? Nuclear learning and worst-case thinking are common but not satisfactory answers. On the basis of primary sources in multiple languages, we posit that a particular temporalization of nuclear events in the beginning of the 1990s took place: nonproliferation timescaping. The Iraqi case of opaque proliferation was treated as the harbinger of future nuclear danger, while the breakup of the nuclear-armed USSR was depicted as not repeatable or not to worry about, and South African nuclear disarmament was reframed as a non-proliferation success.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Strategic Studies
Early online date03 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 03 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • futures
  • Iraq
  • Nuclear disarmament
  • nuclear proliferation
  • South Africa

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'How dawn turned into dusk: Scoping and closing possible nuclear futures after the Cold War'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this