Influence of pacing strategy on O-2 uptake and exercise tolerance

Andrew M. Jones, D. P. Wilkerson, A. Vanhatalo, Mark Burnley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    80 Citations (SciVal)

    Abstract

    Seven male subjects completed cycle exercise bouts to the limit of tolerance on three occasions: (1) at a constant work rate (340±57 W; even-pace strategy; ES); (2) at a work rate that was initially 10% lower than that in the ES trial but which then increased with time such that it was 10% above that in the ES trial after 120 s of exercise (slow-start strategy; SS); and, (3) at a work rate that was initially 10% higher than that in the ES trial but which then decreased with time such that it was 10% below that in the ES trial after 120 s of exercise (fast-start strategy; FS). The expected time to exhaustion predicted from the pre-established power–time relationship was 120 s in all three conditions. However, the time to exhaustion was significantly greater (P<0.05) for the FS (174±56 s) compared with the ES (128±21 s) and SS (128±30 s) conditions. In the FS condition, V̇O2 increased more rapidly toward its peak such that the total O2 consumed in the first 120 s of exercise was greater (ES: 5.15±0.78; SS: 5.07±0.83; FS: 5.36±0.84 L; P<0.05 for FS vs ES and SS). These results suggest that a fast-start pacing strategy might enhance exercise tolerance by increasing the oxidative contribution to energy turnover and hence “sparing” some of the finite anaerobic capacity across the transition to high-intensity exercise.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)615-626
    Number of pages12
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
    Volume18
    Issue number5
    Early online date07 Dec 2007
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

    Keywords

    • V̇O2 kinetics
    • critical power
    • anaerobic work capacity
    • exercise performance
    • endurance
    • energetics

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