Investigating the possible negative effects of self-efficacy upon golf putting performance

Stuart Beattie, David Lief, Mark Adamoulas, Emily Jane Oliver

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    34 Citations (SciVal)

    Abstract

    Objectives
    Research has challenged the nature of the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance. For example, at a within-person level of analysis, Vancouver, Thompson, and Williams (2001) found that performance accomplishments had a strong and positive influence upon subsequent efficacy beliefs; however, self-efficacy had a negative relationship with subsequent performance. The present set of experiments extends this research.

    Design
    Two experiments examine the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and learning/performance over time.

    Method
    Novice golfers putted across two conditions that varied in task difficulty.

    Results
    Across both experiments, performance had a significant, strong and positive relationship with subsequent self-efficacy and predicted (at best) 49% of efficacy variance. However, self-efficacy had a weak non-significant negative relationship with subsequent performance in Experiment 1 and in Experiment 2 and only explained (at best) 2.7% of performance variance.

    Conclusion
    The findings reveal that the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance may not be as strong as previously thought.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)434-441
    Number of pages8
    JournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
    Volume12
    Issue number4
    Early online date22 Feb 2011
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

    Keywords

    • Confidence
    • Relationship
    • Reciprocal
    • Within
    • Between

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Investigating the possible negative effects of self-efficacy upon golf putting performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this