Long-term influence of manure and mineral nitrogen applications on plant and soil N-15 and C-13 values from the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment

M. Senbayram, L. Dixon, K. W. T. Goulding, R. Bol

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52 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted Research in the UK provides a unique opportunity to investigate the long-term impacts of environmental change and agronomic practices on plants and soils. We examined the influence of manure and mineral fertiliser applications on temporal trends in the stable N (15N) and C (13C) isotopes of wheat collected during 1968-1979 and 1996-2005, and of soil collected in 1966 and 2000. The soil 15N values in 1966 and 2000 were higher in manure than the mineral N supplied soil; the latter had similar or higher 15N values than non-fertilised soil. The straw 15N values significantly decreased in all N treatments during 1968 to 1979, but not for 1996-2005. The straw 15N values decreased under the highest mineral N supply (192 kg N ha-1 year-1) by 3 from 1968 to 1979. Mineral N supply significantly increased to straw 13C values in dry years, but not in wet years. Significant correlations existed between wheat straw 13C values with cumulative rainfall (March to June). The cultivar Hereward (grown 1996-2005) was less affected by changes in environmental conditions (i.e. water stress and fertiliser regime) than Cappelle Desprez (1968-1979). We conclude that, in addition to fertiliser type and application rates, water stress and, importantly, plant variety influenced plant 13C and 15N values. Hence, water stress and differential variety response should be considered in plant studies using plant 13C and 15N trends to delineate past or recent environmental or agronomic changes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1735-1740
Number of pages6
JournalRapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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