Making research and evaluation more useful and more interesting for information services and their users: A guide for students and practitioners

Christine Urquhart*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Reflections on the recent increase in the number of cross-sectional surveys received by the editorial team of the journal indicated that potential contributors might consider other research techniques, in addition to, or instead of a survey. In this article, Christine Urquhart discusses some different research designs, and different research methods that may help students and practitioners find useful answers to questions about professional practice beyond the standard survey. Researchers could consider research designs such as quasi-experimental techniques, controlled before-after studies, and interrupted time series. The basic principles of such methods are outlined and some examples cited. Other research techniques outlined include those that research subjects might find more interesting to do, such as conjoint analysis and vignettes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-102
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Information and Libraries Journal
Volume41
Issue number1
Early online date11 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2024

Keywords

  • library and information professionals
  • students
  • research design
  • evaluation
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Students
  • Humans
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Information Services
  • Research Design

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