Metamotivational state and dominance: Links with EMG gradients during isokinetic leg extension and a test of the misfit effect

Yusuke Kuroda, Joanne Thatcher, Rhys Thatcher

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    9 Citations (SciVal)

    Abstract

    Although electromyographic (EMG) gradients have been observed in passive musculature during perceptual motor tasks, it is unclear whether this is related to metamotivational state or dominance. In addition, a misfit effect has been suggested whereby individuals report negative psychological responses when metamotivational state and dominance do not match. Research examining these phenomena within an exercise context is limited; therefore, this study used a reversal theory (Apter, 2001) framework to examine two hypotheses. The first hypothesis was that an EMG gradient would be observed when individuals performed isokinetic leg extensions in a telic metamotivational state, regardless of telic or paratelic metamotivational dominance. Second, it was hypothesizsed that telic-dominant individuals and paratelic-dominant individuals would perform better on this task when in the telic and paratelic state, respectively. Altogether, 14 telic-dominant and 12 paratelic-dominant individuals performed 100 self-paced isokinetic leg extensions at a rate of 908 in both telic and paratelic state manipulated conditions. Regardless of state, an EMG gradient was observed in telic-dominant individuals but not in paratelic-dominant individuals. Paratelic-dominant individuals performed better in the paratelic than the telic state condition, whereas in the telic state condition, telic-dominant individuals performed better than paratelic-dominant individuals. Findings add to the debate concerning the role of telic metamotivational state and dominance in the production of EMG gradients. Performance data support the misfit effect that outcomes are more positive when metamotivational state and dominance are congruent. Suggestions for research developments in this area are offered, as are tentative implications for applied practice.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)403-410
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
    Volume29
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

    Keywords

    • Reversal theory
    • telic
    • paratelic
    • exercise

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