Millimetre-wave T-shaped antenna with defected ground structures for 5G wireless networks

Syeda Fizzah Jilani, Akram Alomainy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Proceeding (Non-Journal item)

20 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

This paper presents a T-shaped antenna at millimetre-wave (MMW) frequency ranges to offer a number of advantages including simple structure, high operating bandwidth, and high gain. Defected ground structures (DGS) have been symmetrically added in ground in order to produce multiple resonating bands, accompanied by partial ground plane to achieve continuous operating bandwidth. The antenna consists of T-shaped radiating patch with a coplanar waveguide (CPW) feed. The bottom part has a partial ground plane loaded with five symmetrical split-ring slots. Measured results of antenna prototype show a wide bandwidth of 25.1-37.5 GHz. Moreover, simulation evaluation of peak gain of the antenna is 9.86 dBi at 36.8 GHz, and efficiency is higher than 80% in complete range of operation. The proposed antenna is considered as a potential candidate for the 5G wireless networks and applications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2016 Loughborough Antennas and Propagation Conference, LAPC 2016
PublisherIEEE Press
ISBN (Electronic)9781509007820
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05 Jan 2017
Event2016 Loughborough Antennas and Propagation Conference, LAPC 2016 - Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Duration: 14 Nov 201615 Nov 2016

Publication series

Name2016 Loughborough Antennas and Propagation Conference, LAPC 2016

Conference

Conference2016 Loughborough Antennas and Propagation Conference, LAPC 2016
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
CityLoughborough, Leicestershire
Period14 Nov 201615 Nov 2016

Keywords

  • Defected ground structure (DGS)
  • millimetre-wave (MMW)
  • patch
  • surface current

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