Negative priming effects in children engaged in nonspatial tasks: evidence for early development of an intact inhibitory mechanism

Verena E Pritchard, Ewald Neumannxx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three experiments are reported that examined conceptual negative priming effects in children 5 to 12 years of age. Experiment 1 used a negative priming variant of a flanker task requiring the naming of a central color blob flanked by irrelevant distractors. Experiment 2 used a negative priming variant of the Stroop color-word task. Experiment 3 used a same-different matching task with novel 3-D shapes. Results revealed significant and equivalent magnitudes of negative priming across the tested age groups for all 3 tasks. It is concluded that the inhibitory mechanism underlying conceptual (i.e., identity or semantic) negative priming in visual selective attention tasks is intact in young children. Because the findings and conclusions diverge from the developmental literature on negative priming, the authors attempt to reconcile the contradictions by pinning down the reasons for the discrepancies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-203
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2004

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