Neohornibrookella sorrentae (Chapman and Crespin, 1928) and allied ostracod taxa from the Neogene of southeastern Australia: Systematic and palaeoceanographical relationships, palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography

Mark T. Warne, Robin Whatley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (SciVal)
295 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Three closely allied shallow marine taxa, Neohornibrookella sorrentae (Chapman and Crespin), Neohornibrookella glyphica (Neil), and Neohornibrookella nepeani sp. nov. are recorded from latest early Miocene to late Pliocene strata in southeastern Australia. These taxa, together with Neohornibrookella quadranodosa (Holden) from the Miocene of Midway Island (Northwestern Hawaiian Islands), form a morphologically distinct group of relatively large species (the sorrentae-group) within the genus Neohornibrookella Jellinek. Latitudinal expansion of the subtropical and warm-temperate climatic belts together with the influence of warm western boundary surface currents associated with the North and South Pacific gyres, are likely to have played key roles in the Miocene dispersal of this species group. Species of the sorrentae-group first migrated south from equatorial west Pacific regions into southeastern Australia during the early Miocene, under the influence of the East Australian Current. During three time intervals (i) latest early Miocene, (ii) latest late Miocene and (iii) earliest late Pliocene, forceful pulses of the East Australian Current played a significant role in propelling the widespread distribution of thermophilic Neohornibrookella species across southeast Australian shallow marine realms. During intervening middle and late Miocene times, Neohornibrookella species are only sporadically present across the Bass Strait region of southeast Australia, indicating a weaker East Australian Current influence and the cooling influence of coastal upwelling. During the midearly Pliocene Neohornibrookella species disappeared from the western Bass Strait region, suggesting the complete exclusion of East Australian Current waters from this region. This was probably due to the counteracting influence of the eastward flowing Zeehan Current (extension of the Leeuwin Current) impinging on the western Bass Strait region. This mid early Pliocene palaeobiogeographical partition in Bass Strait, defined by the distribution of sorrentae-group species, is here termed the Bassian Gateway. The two species, N. sorrentae and N. glyphica, occur concurrently during the mid Miocene in southeast Australia, but are associated with different lithofacies. It is hypothesised that there is a heterochronic evolutionary relationship expressed in the ornament of these two species. The thaerocytherid genera Neohornibrookella Jellinek, Tenedocythere Sissingh and Bosasella Bonaduce are here included in the new ostracod subfamily Tenedocytherinae
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-133
JournalMarine Micropaleontology
Volume125
Early online date09 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 May 2016

Keywords

  • Neohornibrookella
  • Tenedocytherinae
  • Ostracoda
  • Neogene
  • Bass Strait
  • East Australian Current

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Neohornibrookella sorrentae (Chapman and Crespin, 1928) and allied ostracod taxa from the Neogene of southeastern Australia: Systematic and palaeoceanographical relationships, palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this