No Evidence for Resistance to Fenbendazole in Trichostrongylus tenuis, a Nematode Parasite of the Red Grouse

Ruth Cox*, David Newborn, David Baines, Christopher J. Thomas, Thomas N. Sherratt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus tenuis has a detrimental effect on red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus) at the individual and population levels. Treatment using grit coated with the anthelmintic fenbendazole hydrochloride reduces parasite infection and increases grouse density. However, a frequent and low dose of anthelmintic increases selection pressure for parasite resistance, a serious practical and economic problem. We used an egg hatch assay to test resistance of T. tenuis from 12 moors in northern England, which differed in grit treatment intensity. The anthelmintic concentration that prevented 50% and 95% of T. tenuis eggs from hatching (ED(50) and ED(95), respectively) did not differ among moors and were not related to treatment. We suggest annual monitoring and responsible anthelmintic use to prevent resistance so that medicated grit continues to enhance red grouse management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1799-1805
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Wildlife Management
Volume74
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Keywords

  • AVIAN HOSTS
  • DRUG-RESISTANCE
  • HAEMONCHUS-CONTORTUS
  • red grouse
  • Trichostrongylus
  • anthelmintic resistance
  • ANTHELMINTIC RESISTANCE
  • nematode
  • LAGOPUS-LAGOPUS-SCOTICUS
  • medicated grit
  • POPULATION
  • BENZIMIDAZOLE-RESISTANCE
  • SHEEP
  • fenbendazole
  • SELECTION
  • VETERINARY IMPORTANCE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'No Evidence for Resistance to Fenbendazole in Trichostrongylus tenuis, a Nematode Parasite of the Red Grouse'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this