On methodology and myths: Exploring the International Crisis Group's organisational culture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (SciVal)
268 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Exploring the historiography of the International Crisis Group (ICG), this article looks critically at the narratives surrounding the organisation’s self-declared success. The focus is specifically on the so-called icg methodology, consisting of field-based research and analysis, practical policy recommendations and high-level advocacy. Combining a three-level approach to the analysis of organisational cultures with Yanow’s concept of organisational myths, the article argues that the icg methodology contains a number of organisational myths that are meant to mask tensions and contradictions in the organisation’s underpinning basic assumptions and values, which, if publicly discussed, could have the power to undermine its expert authority. The four myths looked at in detail are the ‘field facts myth’, the ‘myth of flexible pragmatism’, the ‘myth of uniqueness’ and the ‘neutrality/independence myth’.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)616-633
Number of pages18
JournalThird World Quarterly
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • International Crisis Group (icg)
  • expert authority
  • knowledge
  • knowledge market
  • myth
  • organisational culture
  • storytelling

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On methodology and myths: Exploring the International Crisis Group's organisational culture'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this