Optimisation of slow-pyrolysis process conditions to maximise char yield and heavy metal adsorption of biochar produced from different feedstocks

E. Hodgson, Alun James, S. Rao Ravella, S. Thomas Jones, W. Perkins, Joseph Gallagher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)
434 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The objective of this work was to identify biomass feedstocks and optimum pyrolysis process conditions to produce a biochar capable of adsorbing metals from polluted groundwater. Taguchi experimental design was used to determine the effects of slow-pyrolysis process conditions on char yield and zinc adsorption. Treatments were repeated using six candidate feedstocks (Lolium perenne, Lolium perenne fibre, Miscanthus x giganteus, Salix viminalis, Fraxinus excelsior and Picea sitchensis) and the resultant chars were tested for metal adsorption performance. Chars produced from L. perenne and its extracted fibre displayed the greatest zinc adsorption performance and removed 83.27-92.96% respectively. Optimum process conditions in terms of both char yield and zinc adsorption performance were achieved from slow-pyrolysis at 300 °C for 2 h using a feedstock with a particle size of less than 1 mm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)574-581
Number of pages8
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume214
Issue numberN/A
Early online date07 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • Remediation
  • Zinc
  • Taguchi-method
  • Bio-refinery
  • Grasses
  • Metals, Heavy/chemistry
  • Water Pollutants/chemistry
  • Fraxinus/metabolism
  • Charcoal/chemistry
  • Biomass
  • Hot Temperature
  • Lolium/metabolism
  • Groundwater/chemistry
  • Adsorption
  • Bioreactors
  • Environmental Restoration and Remediation/methods
  • Environmental Pollution
  • Picea/metabolism
  • Salix/metabolism

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Optimisation of slow-pyrolysis process conditions to maximise char yield and heavy metal adsorption of biochar produced from different feedstocks'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this