Oral vaccination of cattle with heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis does not compromise bovine TB diagnostic tests

Gareth J. Jones*, Sabine Steinbach, Iker A. Sevilla, Joseba M. Garrido, Ramon Juste, H. Martin Vordermeier

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

In this study we investigated whether oral uptake of a heat inactivated M. bovis wildlife vaccine by domestic cattle induced systemic immune responses that compromised the use of tuberculin or defined antigens in diagnostic tests for bovine TB. Positive skin test and blood-based IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) results were observed in all calves vaccinated via the parenteral route (i.e. intramuscular). In contrast, no positive responses to tuberculin or defined antigens were observed in either the skin test or IGRA test when performed in calves vaccinated via the oral route. In conclusion, our results suggest that the heat inactivated M. bovis vaccine could be used to vaccinate wildlife in a baited form in conjunction with the following in cattle: (i) continuation of existing tuberculin skin testing or novel skin test formats based on defined antigens; and (ii) the use of IGRA tests utilizing tuberculin or defined antigens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-88
Number of pages4
JournalVeterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume182
Early online date19 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Dec 2016

Keywords

  • Bovine TB
  • Diagnostic tests
  • Heat killed M. bovis
  • Vaccination
  • Disease Reservoirs/microbiology
  • Mycobacterium bovis/immunology
  • Administration, Oral
  • Hot Temperature
  • Tuberculosis, Bovine/diagnosis
  • Vaccination/methods
  • Animals
  • BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage
  • Animals, Wild/immunology
  • Cattle
  • Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
  • Tuberculin Test/methods
  • Interferon-gamma/blood

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