Organic Public Geographies: 'Making the Connection'

Tyler Mitchell, Tom Lovell, Kye Askins, Duncan Fuller, Margaret Roberts, Pete Flaxman, Linzi Gordon, Gail Rothnie, Guy Robinson, Harriet Hawkins, Rachel Wheeldon, Helen Griffiths, Claire Murphy, Ian Cook, Shelley Sacks, Di Swift, Eleanor Rawling, James Evans, Daniel Allen, Heather PrescottJacky Wilson, Alice Williams, Katie Feenay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

A new field of 'public geographies' is taking shape (Fuller 2008) in geography's mainstream journals. While much is 'traditional', with intellectuals disseminating academic research via non-academic outlets (Castree 2006; Mitchell 2008; Oslender 2007), less visible is the 'organic' work and its 'more involved intellectualizing, pursued through working with area-based or single-interest groups, in which the process itself may be the outcome' (Ward 2006: 499; see Fuller and Askins 2010). A number of well-known projects exist where research has been 'done not merely for the people we write about but with them' (Gregory 2005: 188; see also Cahill 2004; Johnston and Pratt 2010). However, collaborative writing of academic publications which gives research participants authorial credit is unusual (mrs kinpainsby 2008; although see Sangtin Writers and Nagar 2006). This paper is about an organic public geographies project called 'Making the connection'. It is written by a diverse collection of (non-) academic participants who contributed to the project before it had started, as it was undertaken, and/or after it had finished. This is a 'messy', process-oriented text (Cook et al. 2007) working through the threads (partially) connecting the activities of its main collaborators, including a referee who helped get the paper to publication.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)909-926
Number of pages18
JournalAntipode
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2011

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