Patterns of chemokine expression in models of Schistosoma mansoni inflammation and infection reveal relationships between type 1 and type 2 responses and chemokines in vivo

Matthew K. Park, Karl F. Hoffmann, A. W. Cheever, D. Amichay, T. A. Wynn, J. M. Farber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

To explore the roles of chemokines in type 1 and type 2 responses in vivo, we examined mRNA expression for a panel of up to 17 chemokines in experimental mouse models using Schistosoma mansoni. These studies revealed that Mig (monokine induced by gamma interferon), cytokine-responsive gene 2/10-kDa interferon-inducible protein, RANTES, lymphotactin, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta), JE/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and MIP-2 are associated with type 1 egg-induced responses and that thymus-derived chemotactic agent 3 (TCA3), eotaxin, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1gamma are associated with type 2 egg-induced responses. After cercarial infection, both type 1-associated and type 2-associated chemokines were elevated in the livers of infected mice presensitized with eggs and recombinant interleukin-12 (rIL-12), a regimen that diminishes pathology. Neutralization of IL-12 or gamma interferon during egg deposition reversed the effects of prior treatment with rIL-12, leading to a return to larger granulomas; persistently elevated expression of TCA3, eotaxin, and MIP-1alpha; and a marked reduction in the expression of type 1-associated chemokines despite the maintenance of a dominant type 1 cytokine response in the draining lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that there are patterns of coordinate chemokine expression characteristic of type 1 and type 2 responses in vivo; that the cells recruited by a given pattern of chemokines may differ, depending on the composition of peripheral populations; and that patterns of tissue expression of chemokines may determine the character of an inflammatory response independently of the dominant pattern of differentiation of antigen-specific T cells. Our data reveal new relationships between chemokines and polarized immune responses and suggest that end organ inflammation might be altered by chemokine blockade without necessitating reversal of the phenotype of the majority of differentiated T cells.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6755-6768
Number of pages14
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume69
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2001

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