Playfully coding: Embedding computer science outreach in schools

Hannah Dee, Xefi Cufi, Alfredo Milani, Marius Marian, Valentina Poggioni, Olivier Aubreton, Anna Roura Rabionet, Tomi Rowlands

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Proceeding (Non-Journal item)

Abstract

This paper describes a framework for successful interaction between universities and schools. It is common for computing academics interested in outreach (computer science evangelism) to work with local schools, particularly in countries where the computing curriculum in K-12 is new or underdeveloped. However it is rare for these collaborations to be ongoing, and for resources created through these school-university links to be shared beyond the immediate neighborhood. We have achieved this, through shared resources, careful evaluation, and cross-country collaboration. The activities themselves are inspired by ideas from the Lifelong Kindergarten group at MIT, emphasizing playful exploration of computational concepts and interdisciplinary working.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationITiCSE '17
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages176-181
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781450347044
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2017
Event2017 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE 2017 - Bologna, Italy
Duration: 03 Jul 201705 Jul 2017

Publication series

NameAnnual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE
VolumePart F128680
ISSN (Print)1942-647X

Conference

Conference2017 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE 2017
Country/TerritoryItaly
CityBologna
Period03 Jul 201705 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Computational thinking
  • Playful coding
  • School-University links

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