Reflections on the simulation of complex systems for science

Fiona A.C. Polack, Paul S. Andrews, Teodor Ghetiu, Mark Read, Susan Stepney, Jon Timmis, Adam T. Sampson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Proceeding (Non-Journal item)

16 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

In studying complex systems, agent-based simulations offer the possibility of directly modelling components in an environment. However, the scientific value of agent-based simulations has been limited by inadequate scientific rigour. The paper focuses on agent-based simulations that are used in biological and bio-medical research. Starting from a review of best practice in simulation engineering, the paper identifies some of the key activities in developing complex systems simulations that support scientific research, and how these contribute to the essential development of mutual trust among developers and scientists. Examples from the authors' own experience illustrate how a range of studies have manifested these key activities, and identifies some successes and problems encountered.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2010 15th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS 2010
Pages276-285
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event15th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS 2010 - Oxford, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Duration: 22 Mar 201026 Mar 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS

Conference

Conference15th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS 2010
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
CityOxford
Period22 Mar 201026 Mar 2010

Keywords

  • Complex system modelling
  • Scientific simulation
  • Simulation validation

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