Temporal and spatial Mycobacterium bovis prevalence patterns as evidenced in the All Wales Badgers Found Dead (AWBFD) survey of infection 2014–2016

Paul Schroeder*, Beverley Hopkins, Jeff Jones, Terry Galloway, Ryan Pike, Simon Rolfe, Glyn Hewinson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

In order to better understand the spatial spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Wales, an All Wales Badgers Found Dead (AWBFD) survey was carried out from 2014–2016. For Wales, as a whole, there was a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in prevalence of bTB in badgers since a similar survey was carried out in 2005–2006, with a drop from 13.3% to 7.3%. The highest prevalence was observed for the High TB Area East (18.6%), which shares its border with England, and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from the High TB Area West (7.4%). The lowest proportion of carcases diagnosed with the disease (0.7%) was in the Low TB Area, followed by the two Intermediate TB Areas of Wales (2.7%). The M. bovis isolates from badgers tended to be similar to the genotypes of cattle in the same area, except in the Low TB Area. The direction of any cross species transmission and the drivers for this cannot be determined from this study. The spatial variations described here support the need for regionally adapted surveillance and control measures for bovine tuberculosis in Wales.

Original languageEnglish
Article number15214
Number of pages11
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
Early online date16 Sept 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Female
  • Male
  • Mustelidae/microbiology
  • Mycobacterium bovis/isolation & purification
  • Population Surveillance
  • Prevalence
  • Spatio-Temporal Analysis
  • Tuberculosis/epidemiology
  • Wales/epidemiology

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