The effects of team status and supporter group status on commitment to supporting a sport team'

G. A. Hall, R. Thomson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Proceeding (Non-Journal item)

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Abstract

For most sports fans their self-concept is also related to their identity as a supporter of a specific sport team. The Collective Self-Esteem Scale (CSES),
with four subscales (group membership, private self-esteem, public self-esteem, and identity), was evaluated as a predictor of supporter identification with their
supporter group and their team; and then correlated with a recently developed commitment scale, with four subscales (loyalty, attendance, individualism, and
identification). In experiment 1 Welsh and Irish rugby supporters (N=92), were handed either positive or negative false information about the status of their in-
group. Both the CSES and supporter commitment scale were highly significant (F= 110.689, p < 0.01, F=4.803, p < 0.05). In experiment 2 Welsh supporters
( N=82), were handed either a positive or negative false information about the status of their team. Both the CSES and supporter commitment scale were not
significant, although subscale identification was (F= 9.048, p < 0.05). Consistent with social identity theory, low status affected identification in both experiments.
However, low status lowered collective self-esteem when their supporter group status was threatened. In addition, results show group membership was
important regardless of supporter group status.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAustralian Journal of Psychology
PublisherWiley
Volume58
Edition1
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

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