The influence of vehicle model and colour on assessments of speed and culpability: the case for (and against) Computer Generated Exhibits (CGE)The effects of stereotypes on perceptions of speed and culpability in a road traffic accident

Gareth Norris, Heather Reeves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Computer Generated Exhibits (CGE) are frequently deployed in legal contexts under the rubric of demonstrative evidence, i.e. to facilitate juror comprehension. However, a number of legal and academic commentators have suggested that the nature of the computerised moving image could exert undue prejudice on decision makers, e.g. judge and/or jury. The current study aimed to assess the manipulation of vehicle characteristics (make and colour) when a road traffic accident was presented in the format of a computer generated animation (CGA). In experiment 1, two groups of subjects watched two different makes of car, a Range Rover Sport and a Volkswagen Touran in a black-and-white format; no significant differences emerged over vehicle model with regards to vehicle speed or overall responsibility for the accident. Experiment 2 presented the same vehicles to four groups of participants in full colour, with the cars in contrasting red or beige; significant differences emerged with regards to culpability for vehicle make only. The findings could have implications for the format and style of CGE used in legal settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-48
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Review of Law, Computers and Technology
Volume26
Issue number1
Early online date27 Feb 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Apr 2012

Keywords

  • forensic animations
  • computer generated evidence
  • demonstrative evidence

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