The revised International Health Regulations: socialization, compliance and changing norms of global health security

Adam Kamradt-Scott, Simon Berkeley Rushton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

This paper takes a constructivist approach to examining one of the new norms embodied in the recently revised International Health Regulations (IHR). The paper focuses on the provisions that seek to restrain states from applying disproportionate international travel and trade restrictions in response to a disease outbreak occurring in another country. This new norm, which aims to limit unjustified ‘additional health measures’, has significant implications for state sovereignty. Using the example of the 2009 H1N1 ‘swine flu’ pandemic, the paper examines whether state behaviour and the discourse surrounding that outbreak supports a constructivist contention that a new norm has been created and that most states can be expected to comply with that norm most of the time. We conclude by discussing what the discourse over H1N1 suggests about the extent to which the new norm concerning additional health measures has been internalized by states.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-70
JournalGlobal Change, Peace and Security
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online date30 Jan 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Keywords

  • global health security
  • international health regulations
  • norm compliance
  • norm life cycle
  • pandemic influenza

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