Tourists and researcher identities: Critical considerations of collisions, collaborations and confluences in Svalbard

Samantha Saville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
378 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Svalbard is an “edge-of-the-world” hot spot for environmental change, political discourse, tourism and scientific research in the Anthropocene. Drawing on ethnographic and qualitative research, I use this context to critically explore the identity-categories of “researcher” and “tourist”. Through the lens of political ecology, I draw out the uneven power relations of knowledge production that are attached to these labels and their consequences for ongoing efforts for managing sustainable tourism. By considering the experiences of tourists, researchers and “scientific tourists”, both practically and from an embodied experiential perspective, I challenge the distinctions typically made between these roles. I bring to light several common aspects, goals and experiences these practices share. In doing so, I aim to disrupt the existing hierarchies of knowledge that champion an impersonal, rational scientific approach and call for a more varied array of knowledge and practices to be taken into account when considering the future ecologies of Svalbard and the broader Arctic region
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sustainable Tourism
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • identity
  • knowledge production
  • political ecology
  • Anthropocene
  • Svalbard

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